Is DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES A Riff On BATTLE?

When will the film be set? What will Caesar be doing? Andy Serkis gives clues. 

Is DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES A Riff On BATTLE?

I am filled with hope and dread for Dawn of the Planet of the Apes. Hope because this is my franchise, and I love it most of all and the last film, Rise of the Planet of the Apes, was actually really, really good. Dread because you can never count on lightning to strike twice, and this film has a much shorter development period than the last film. On top of that, I'm not entirely certain that anybody involved in the last film really understood why it worked. 

The other thing that makes me worry is this: Rise brought the story to a place where it's going to get really scifi. Does Fox have the balls to get really weird with this franchise, as it deserves?

Andy Serkis, who plays Caesar, indicates they might. Talking to Coming Soon he says:

"The interesting thing now will be how Caesar operates in this world - because of the virus that hits at the end of the first movie - and how Caesar brings an accord between the apes and the surviving humans and that's going to be interesting where we take that."

First, that sounds a lot like Battle for the Planet of the Apes, a film that sees Caesar and his newly liberated apes attempting to live in peace with humans in a post-apocalyptic worldThat Serkis is talking about 'surviving humans' makes me think the movie's going to be quite scifi, with the world in ruins. My guess: just as in Battle there are conflicts within ape society about how to deal with the humans. Meanwhile, the humans take one last run at the apes.. maybe even going so far as to launch nukes, bringing us closer to the status quo of the original Planet of the Apes

I'm full of hope. If the apes are really talking this time around, I'll be ecstatic. 

Source: Coming Soon
Devin Faraci's photo About the Author: A ten year veteran of writing for the web, Devin has built a reputation as a loud, uncompromising and honest voice – sometimes to the chagrin of his readers, but usually to their delight.
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